Welcome to
Flying Eyeballs .net


Lead free Pewter pins, emblems, and assorted cool stuff
from the twisted mind of Unkl Ian.


^ Flying Eyeball pin #260
2 1/2" wide. $20.00
                
^ Flying Eyeball emblem #255
          Bolt On, with2  8-32 studs and Nyloc nuts on back.
5 3/4" wide. Weighs 1/3 pound !
$50.00


^ Flying Eyeball pin #240
2 5/16" wide. $20.00
 
^ Flying Eyeball emblem #235
  Bolt On, with a single 1/4-20 stud  and Nyloc nut on back.
5 7/8" wide.  $35.00

 

^ Flying Eyeball emblem #225
  Bolt On, with 2 8-32 studs  and Nyloc nuts on back.
4 5/8" wide. $15.00























^ Flying Eyeball emblem #215
w/single 8-32 stud and Nyloc nut on back
$12.00


 
^ Flying Eyeball pin #210
3 1/4" wide.  $10.00
 
 
 
^  Flying Eyeball emblem #205 
w/single 8-32 stud and Nyloc nut on back
$12.00

 
^ Flying Eyeball pin #200
3 1/4" wide.  $10.00


 

Flying Eyeball Pin #190
2 1/4" wide$25.00 




  ^ Flying Eyeball Pin #180
3 1/4" wide.   $25.00











 
^ Flying Eyeball emblem #175
  Bolt On, with 8-32 studs and Nyloc nuts on back.
5 3/4" wide.  $35.00


 

^ Flying Eyeball pin #170
  4" wide.  $25.00
 


^ Flying Eyeball pin #160
  2" wide.  $20.00


 
^ Flying Eyeball pin #150
  2" wide. 
$20.00

 
 
^ Flying Eyeball pin #140
    3" wide.  $25.00

 
 
^ Flying Eyeball pin #130
  3" wide. 
$25.00
 
 






















 
^ Flying Eyeball pin #120
1 1/2" wide. 
$20.00
 
 










 
^ Flying Eyeball pin #110
  
2 5/16" wide.  $20.00
 
 
 
  ^ Flying Eyeball emblem #105
  dual 8-32 studs and Nyloc nuts on back.
3 1/4" wide.  
$30.00

#
 
^ Flying Eyeball pin #100
3 1/4" wide. $25.00
 


Each of these pieces is created, one at a time, by Unkl Ian,
in his Top Secret underground bunker.
Since they are completely hand made,
no two will ever be exactly the same.


To place an order, or ask questions,
please contact:

Unkl Ian




The unofficial history of the flying eyeball.

The flying eyeball, as we know it,
first appeared in southern California in the late 40's, early 50's.

The first to paint a flying eyeball was either Von Dutch, or Dean Jeffries.
Opinions vary, but both had their own variation on the idea.

In the late 60's the flying eyeball appeared in concert posters,
underground comics, and album art by Rick Griffin, and Stanley Mouse.

Each artist put their own spin on the same idea:
 Jeffries' was very anatomically correct, with a severed optic nerve,
Griffin added arms and legs, some wore viking helmets and carried swords.
Perhaps the best known, in automotive circles, is the design that
Von Dutch painted on the back of his leather jacket.

Since then, the flying eyeball has become synonymous with
southern California retro automotive culture, hot rods, rat rods,
and what is now known as Kustom Kulture.

To be continued.....